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Teddy Bridgewater Meets Teammates for Florida Workouts

Vikings tight end Kyle Rudolph posted a photo of he and several teammates working out with quarterback Teddy Bridgewater. Joining Rudolph and Bridgewater were wide receivers Adam Thielen, Jarius Wright, Cordarrelle Patterson and Charles Johnson along with tight end MyCole Pruitt.

While some fans responded back to Rudolph's post and asked why second-year receiver Stefon Diggs wasn't with the group, Diggs sent out a tweet of his own to clarify things:

The guys looking awesome out there. Got one more day of training then I'm on the first flight out.

— IG: stefondiggs (@stefon_diggs) April 4, 2016

Alex Boone graded as one of league's best free agency signings

In a look back at the NFL's free agency period, which kicked off on March 9, ESPN writer Kevin Seifert covered a number of categories across the league, one of them being "best signings." Seifert listed new Vikings guard Alex Boone as one of the top inked deals of the month, saying Boone will "help transform" Minnesota's offensive line.

Joining Boone in Seifert's list of top signings were running back Matt Forte (Jets), wide receiver Chris Hogan (Patriots) and cornerback Sean Smith (Raiders).

Seifert identified NFC North rival Green Bay as making the move that "made too much sense":

Quietly last week, the Packers signed Jared Cook – a 6-foot-5, 254-pound tight end who once ran the 40-yard dash in a stunning 4.49 seconds. Everything about Cook screams major offensive weapon.

Seifert believes Cook's signing will give Aaron Rodgers a weapon at the post capable of doing damage the way that retired tight end Jermichael Finley did. Finley posted 55 or more receptions and at least 667 yards in three of four seasons (2009-12).

Seifert also created a "biggest leap of faith," category, in which he placed the Texans' deal with former Broncos quarterback Brock Osweiler.

The state of quarterbacking in the NFL meant someone would take a chance on Osweiler. It turned out to be the Texans. But if anyone tells you they know how this will turn out, they're lying.

Priefer: New Touchback Rule Won't Change Mindset with Patterson

Following the adoption of the new touchback rule at the recent NFL Owners meetings in Boca Raton, Florida, Vikings Special Teams Coordinator Mike Priefer was asked about how the rule will affect the Vikings in 2016. ESPN's Ben Goessling wrote about Priefer's thoughts on the adjustment heading into a new season.

"I'm glad the league is keeping it in; it's a safer play than most people realize," Priefer told Goessling. "Everybody wants to say, '[…] it's a big, high-collision play.' But there are no more wedges; you don't have guys blowing up the wedge like they used to. Coaches have done a great job of coaching this play differently. Guys aren't getting hurt like they used to. The league needs to keep the play in the game. If they want to tweak the rules, that's fine, but it's not as dangerous as people think."

Goessling added:

For most teams that face the Vikings, the danger might lie more in what Cordarrelle Patterson can do with a football than whether injuries will happen on the play.

Patterson was once again an asset on special teams for Minnesota in 2015, leading the league in return average and average drive starting position. Goessling also pointed out that only 35.1 percent of Vikings opponents' kickoffs ended without a return.

"We put him at nine [yards] deep and tell him, 'Bring out everything you can catch square and get going,' " Priefer said. "We're going to bring it out. We're going to take the good with the bad. That might change depending on the team you play – if you're playing Denver, who has a phenomenal defense, you might take it at the 25. It will be a weekly deal. But I'm an aggressive coach by nature, and Coach [Mike] Zimmer's an aggressive coach."

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