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Keenum Finds 4 Different Teammates for Touchdown Passes

LANDOVER, Md. — By the end of the Vikings 38-30 win at Washington, it was easier to count the number of offensive skill players who didn't have a touchdown than count the ones who did.

Minnesota saw five different players find the end zone Sunday — four of them through the air — in an attack engineered by Case Keenum.

The Vikings quarterback connected with wide receivers Stefon Diggs, Adam Thielen and Jarius Wright for scores, and also found tight end David Morgan for his first career touchdown catch. 

"I think that's a great job of game-planning," Keenum said. "I think you've got to give credit to coaches, and we had a lot of guys making plays today, too, from top to bottom.

"When I've got a trust like that in those guys to go make plays, I'm going to let them have a chance, and good things happen," Keenum added.

Added Morgan: "That's what was awesome, the ball was getting spread around to everybody. We were running the ball, passing the ball well, and we protected the quarterback well. When you can give Case time back there to make those throws, great things will happen."

Keenum completed 21 of 29 passes for 304 yards and those four touchdowns, which set a career high for the Texas native. He had a passer rating of 117.0, his second-highest mark of the season, and surpassed the 300-yard mark for the second time Purple.

It all added up to 38 points by the Vikings offense, the unit's top output of 2017 so far.

Keenum, who signed with the Vikings as a free agent this past offseason, was asked about his comfort level with Minnesota's offense and if it's the most comfortable he's been in the NFL.

"There's always more to it than might meet the eye, but I feel great. I love this squad, I love this team, I love this offense, I love the coaches," Keenum said. "We're having fun, moving the ball, scoring lots of points, which was a lot of fun today."

Keenum's performance came as the Vikings moved to 7-2 while putting up 407 total yards of offense, Minnesota's third-best tally of the season.

Keenum's teammates said they weren't surprised that he was raring to go after the team was off last weekend for its bye. 

"Well first of all, he's a fighter," Thielen said. "And he's going to know the game plan like nobody, better than the offensive coordinator, maybe. 

"So he does a great job of just giving us opportunities to catch the ball, and good things happen when we can make plays and extend drives," Thielen added. "He's just a confident guy and a guy that just wants to compete."

Added Diggs: "We kind of give him that positive energy every chance that we get. You try to give him that confidence when he throws the ball that it's going to come down in our hands."

Keenum did throw a pair of second-half interceptions that led to seven Washington points, but those two throws were the only blemish on a stellar day for the quarterback. 

"A win is a win, so obviously very pleased with that, but we made things interesting," Keenum said. "I think me, myself, I put our team in a tough spot there. We've got to learn how to finish games playing ahead. Yeah, definitely something to work on."

The Vikings are 5-2 in games that Keenum has started, and he helped lead them to a sixth win when he entered at halftime against Chicago.

Keenum and the Vikings lit up the scoreboard Sunday near the nation's capital, and even with a few mistakes sprinkled in, the quarterback played one of the best games of his career.

"Case played outstanding, you know, I wish the two throws he had in the second half, that he would have not made," said Vikings Head Coach Mike Zimmer. "But he's an excitable guy, and he needs to understand when they're good plays and bad plays, sometimes."

Keenum said bad footwork was partly to blame for the first of two passes picked by his former Texans teammate D.J. Swearinger.

"Definitely that was one of the first things that Coach [Kevin] Stefanski said, that my feet were in a bad place. It was just a poor decision. When things aren't, when they don't fit my eye, when I don't see it well, I need to not make a bad play worse. That was a gift. I played with Swearinger back in our Houston days, so I gave him a gift on that one."

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