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3 Stats That Stood Out: Vikings-Eagles NFC Championship

The Vikings scored a touchdown on their opening drive, but the Eagles countered with 38 unanswered points on Sunday to win the NFC Championship and advance to Super Bowl LII.

Here are three stats that stood out:

1. Third-and-longs

Aside from being minus-3 in turnover margin, the next most-influential aspect of the game was the success of Philadelphia's offense against Minnesota's defense on third downs.

The Eagles converted 10 of 14 (71 percent) against a Vikings defense that only allowed 51 conversions on 202 third downs in the regular season.

It was even worse on third-and-6 or more to go. The Eagles converted six of seven of those situations (does not include a kneel-down on the game's final snap).

A gain of 11 on third-and-10 set up Philadelphia's second touchdown, and the Eagles scored on a 53-yard touchdown pass from Nick Foles to Alshon Jeffery on another third-and-10 before halftime.

2. Pressure packed

The scoring margin forced the Vikings offense to be less balanced and helped the Eagles to create pressure on Case Keenum.

Analytics site Pro Football Focus noted that, out of 50 dropbacks, the Eagles pressured Keenum 24 times (48 percent). Keenum was 11-of-22 passing for 108 yards with one touchdown and one interception when pressured.

3. Limited opportunities

The Vikings and Eagles each had just nine possessions.

After smoothly navigating 75 yards for a touchdown, Minnesota's next five possessions of the first half netted 110 yards on 29 plays and ended with interception, punt, punt, fumble and punt, respectively.

Minnesota ranked second in time of possession (32:26), behind only Philadelphia (32:41) in 2017, but the Eagles won that category 34:04 to 25:56 on Sunday.

The Vikings won time of possession in the first half, but they trailed 24-7 at the break. The Eagles controlled the ball for 11:16 of the third quarter and 9:32 of the fourth, effectively eliminating an opportunity for a comeback and limiting Minnesota to just three possessions.

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