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Jake Reed: 'You Got Mossed'

Posted Sep 5, 2017

In the years before Randy Moss joined the Vikings, Cris Carter and Jake Reed made up one of the NFL’s best receiving tandems.

Carter and Reed each topped 1,000 receiving yards from 1994 to 1997, each thriving when a defense focused on the other player.

When Moss arrived in 1998, the three-headed monster of Carter, Moss and Reed became known as Three Deep.

“He kind of changed the culture of the locker room and the culture of the plays we called. He could do some things that me and Cris just couldn’t do,” Reed said. “We had four straight 1,000-yard seasons, but he could run the way we couldn’t run. He posed a threat to the opposite team that me and Cris couldn’t pose.

“It was fun for us because once we got on the field, teams had to pick their poison,” Reed added. “Who are you going to cover … Cris Carter, Jake Reed or Randy Moss?” 

Reed totaled 450 receptions for 6,999 yards and 36 touchdowns in his 12-year career, 10 of which were spent in Purple.

A third-round pick in 1991, he and Carter were a force to be reckoned with in the mid-1990s.

Reed still had a starting spot when Moss arrived, but that changed when he underwent back surgery in November of 1998.

Moss stepped in as the starter on Thanksgiving Day, catching three passes for 163 yards and three scores, and Reed knew the starting gig was no longer his. 

Reed said he cherishes memories of his time with Moss, whether it was grueling workouts or playing cards on Monday nights at one of the receivers’ houses.

And Reed said he’s proud to have had a front-row seat to the premier of one of the greatest wide receivers in NFL history.

“It’s no wonder that people today still say, ‘You got Mossed.’ It means something if you get Mossed,” Reed said. “You didn’t have that … when people give you a little tag behind your name, you know that you really did some things in the NFL.

“No one says you got Jerry Riced, they say, ‘You got Mossed.’ No one says you got Cris Cartered, they say, ‘You got Mossed,’ ” Reed added. “He was doing things to defensive backs that they couldn’t understand.”